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American Bedroom Documentary Photography Series

After enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Barbara Peacock’s ongoing documentary photography project American Bedroom is a look inside the intimate rooms of everyday Americans.

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Josh (age 38), Rean (age 37), Jackson (age 5), and Amelia (1 year). “I hate my bedroom. It’s so cramped and small. But, we waited a long time to have kids so when we are all together I’m happy.” Rean. Merrimac, Massachusetts

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.



Alice & Chris, age 38 and 40. “Time alone is rare with busy lives, two kids, and a cat. Any time we get we savor, as summer just seems to seep away.” Portland, Maine

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Cody, age 15. “It’s been really frustrating. I can’t do anything. I can’t hang out with my friends, can’t play sports. I’m stuck here…just me and my illness.” (Rheumatic Fever) Portland, Maine

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Pepere, age 88. “When I wake up in the morning, I try to be very quiet so I don’t wake her, then I remember she is not there.” Jay, Maine

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Jessica, age 18. “Sometimes life throws you in all sorts of directions, the most important part
about life is to remember you are exactly where you need to be.” Milford, New Hampshire

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Nito, age 35. “Much of what you see isn’t some showcase of fun colorful things I’ve acquired. Everything contains a story attached to my friends and life experiences. So, despite its cluttered look, having easy access to those cherished memories is quite calming and helps me still feel close to those people and experiences.” Cambridge, Massachusetts

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Carroll , age 95. “Is this my home?” Biddeford, Maine

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Jon, age 71. “My wife and I, along with our Charley dog and two cats, live in a round house at the end of a ridge of the Blue Ridge Mountains, because we believe in the circle of life and that what goes around, comes around.” Boone, North Carolina

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Holly & Nathan, age 38 and 40. “We’ve been off the grid for 20 years—we are committed and enjoy helping creative people with their art.” Deep Gap, North Carolina

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Elmer, age 71. “I have lived a life of miracles, and I shall live forever, the flesh looks wasted but the spirit is alive and well.” Boone, North Carolina

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Winslow, age 20. “I just moved home from Chicago, leaving behind dozens of friends and my life for the past year. The only thing of merit I was able to bring home was my cat Juno.” Westford, Massachusetts

fter enjoying a successful commercial photography career and raising a family, photographer Barbara Peacock is embarking on an incredible journey into the bedrooms of average Americans. With American Bedroom, she is taking an intimate—and anthropological—look at the most personal of spaces, asking friends, family, and strangers to open themselves up to her candid photographs.

Avey, age 3. “My fish is died.” Portland, Maine

Barbara Peacock: Website | Facebook | Instagramini